Workplace breastfeeding support and job satisfaction among working mothers in the United States

Margaret D. Whitley, Annie Ro, Bong Kyoo Choi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Job satisfaction is associated with health and productivity. Workplace support for breastfeeding may affect working mothers’ job satisfaction. Methods: We analyzed responses from 488 women from the Infant Feeding Practices Study II (2005-2007). Using logistic regression, we assessed whether workplace breastfeeding problems at 3 months postpartum were related to low job satisfaction concurrently and, for a subsample (n = 265), at 9 and 12 months postpartum. Results: Compared with women reporting no problems, women reporting three or more problems had higher odds (odds ratio [OR] = 4.76; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.03-11.18) of low job satisfaction at 3 months, and at 12 months (OR = 6.88, 95% CI: 1.33-35.58) after controlling for baseline job satisfaction. Models isolating problems with break time and space to pump/nurse showed more modest results. Conclusions: Work-related breastfeeding problems at 3 months postpartum were associated with low job satisfaction concurrently and at follow-up. Improving workplace breastfeeding accommodations could improve mothers’ job satisfaction.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)716-726
Number of pages11
JournalAmerican Journal of Industrial Medicine
Volume62
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2019
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • breastfeeding
  • job satisfaction
  • lactation
  • work-family conflict
  • working parents

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