Vreteno, a gonad-specific protein, is essential for germline development and primary pirna biogenesis in Drosophila

Andrea L. Zamparini, Marie Y. Davis, Colin D. Malone, Eric Vieira, Jiri Zavadil, Ravi Sachidanandam, Gregory J. Hannon, Ruth Lehmann

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

96 Scopus citations

Abstract

In Drosophila, Piwi proteins associate with Piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs) and protect the germline genome by silencing mobile genetic elements. This defense system acts in germline and gonadal somatic tissue to preserve germline development. Genetic control for these silencing pathways varies greatly between tissues of the gonad. Here, we identified Vreteno (Vret), a novel gonad-specific protein essential for germline development. Vret is required for piRNA-based transposon regulation in both germline and somatic gonadal tissues. We show that Vret, which contains Tudor domains, associates physically with Piwi and Aubergine (Aub), stabilizing these proteins via a gonad-specific mechanism that is absent in other fly tissues. In the absence of vret, Piwi-bound piRNAs are lost without changes in piRNA precursor transcript production, supporting a role for Vret in primary piRNA biogenesis. In the germline, piRNAs can engage in an Aub- and Argonaute 3 (AGO3)-dependent amplification in the absence of Vret, suggesting that Vret function can distinguish between primary piRNAs loaded into Piwi-Aub complexes and piRNAs engaged in the amplification cycle. We propose that Vret plays an essential role in transposon regulation at an early stage of primary piRNA processing.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)4039-4050
Number of pages12
JournalDevelopment (Cambridge)
Volume138
Issue number18
DOIs
StatePublished - 15 Sep 2011

Keywords

  • Aubergine
  • Drosophila
  • Germline stem cell
  • Piwi
  • Soma
  • Transposon
  • Tudor
  • piRNAs

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