Vitamin C intake and colorectal cancer survival according to KRAS and BRAF mutation: a prospective study in two US cohorts

Shanshan Shi, Kai Wang, Tomotaka Ugai, Marios Giannakis, Jules Cazaubiel, Andrew T. Chan, Edward L. Giovannucci, Jonathan A. Nowak, Jeffrey A. Meyerhardt, Shuji Ogino, Mingyang Song

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: The associations of vitamin C intake with colorectal cancer (CRC) survival according to tumour KRAS or BRAF mutation status remain unclear. Methods: We used the inverse probability weighted multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression model to calculate the hazard ratio (HR) of mortality, and spline analysis to evaluate the dose–response relationship in the Nurses’ Health Study and Health Professionals Follow-up Study. We also assessed SLC2A1 mRNA expression according to KRAS or BRAF mutation in the TCGA database. Results: During an average of 12.0 years of follow-up, we documented 2,096 CRC cases, of which 703 cases had KRAS and BRAF mutation data. The association between total vitamin C intake and CRC-specific mortality suggestively differed according to KRAS or BRAF mutation status (P interaction = 0.04), with the multivariable HR (95% CI) per 400 mg/day increase in vitamin C intake for CRC-specific mortality of 1.07 (0.87–1.32, P trend = 0.52) in cases with both wild type and 0.74 (0.55–1.00, P trend < 0.05) in cases with either KRAS or BRAF mutant type. TCGA analysis showed a higher mRNA SLC2A1 expression in KRAS or BRAF-mutated tumours than in wild-type tumours (P = 0.02). Conclusion: Our findings support the laboratory evidence for a potential benefit of vitamin C for CRC patients with KRAS or BRAF mutated tumours.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1793-1800
Number of pages8
JournalBritish Journal of Cancer
Volume129
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - 23 Nov 2023
Externally publishedYes

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