Variation in estrogen-related genes and cross-sectional and longitudinal blood pressure in the Framingham Heart Study

Inga Peter, Amanda M. Shearman, Deborah R. Zucker, Christopher H. Schmid, Serkalem Demissie, L. Adrienne Cupples, Martin G. Larson, Ramachandran S. Vasan, Ralph B. D'Agostino, Richard H. Karas, Michael E. Mendelsohn, David E. Housman, Daniel Levy

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82 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: To examine the association between variation in estrogen-related genes and cross-sectional and longitudinal blood pressure in men and women. Design: In 1780 unrelated members of the community-based Framingham Heart Study offspring cohort, systolic blood pressure and diastolic blood pressure were measured over a total of six examination cycles encompassing 24 years of follow-up. Multivariate regression analyses were used to assess the relation between untreated cross-sectional and longitudinal blood pressure and polymorphisms at the estrogen receptor-α (ESR1), estrogen receptor-β (ESR2), aromatase (CYP19A1), and nuclear receptor coactivator 1 (NCOA1) genes after adjustment for common risk factors. Results: In men, systolic blood pressure and pulse pressure (systolic blood pressure minus diastolic blood pressure) were associated with two polymorphisms in ESR1, while pulse pressure was also associated with variations in NCOA1 and CYP19A1. Polymorphisms in ESR1, CYP19A1, and NCOA1 were associated with diastolic blood pressure in women. Conclusions: Although the underlying relations between genes involved in estrogen action and hypertension remain to be completely understood, our findings provide suggestive evidence of gender-specific contributions of estrogen-related genes to blood pressure variation. As no correction for multiple testing was performed in the analyses, we view these results as suggestive and not definitive. Further studies are warranted to confirm these results using a comprehensive set of polymorphisms in order to shed more light on the involvement of estrogen in blood pressure regulation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2193-2200
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Hypertension
Volume23
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2005
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Association
  • Blood pressure
  • Epidemiology
  • Estrogen
  • Hypertension
  • Polymorphism (genetics)
  • Receptors

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