Use of 3-D cortical morphometry for mapping increased cortical gyrification and complexity in Williams syndrome

D. Tosun, A. L. Reiss, A. D. Lee, R. A. Dutton, K. M. Hayashi, U. Bellugi, A. M. Galaburda, J. R. Korenberg, D. L. Mills, A. W. Toga, P. M. Thompson

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionpeer-review

14 Scopus citations

Abstract

In this paper, we describe the use of three different shape measures - i.e., shape index, curvedness, and L2 norm of mean curvature - to quantify cortical gyrification and complexity, thereby evaluating brain structural differences between individuals with Williams syndrome (WS) and healthy controls. Unlike traditional measures of gyrification, the proposed measures analyze the intrinsic geometry of the cortex in three-dimensional (3-D) space. We analyzed the local and global cortical folding patterns of 39 WS and 39 controls using these shape measures, showing increased gyrification in the cingulate, visual cortex, superior parietal lobule, and central sulcus regions (more pronounced in the left brain hemisphere), and increased cortical complexity in left temporal and left parietal lobes in WS. These findings agree with, and extend, previously published studies and may relate to the characteristic clinical and cognitive profiles of individuals with WS.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication2006 3rd IEEE International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging
Subtitle of host publicationFrom Nano to Macro - Proceedings
Pages1172-1175
Number of pages4
StatePublished - 2006
Externally publishedYes
Event2006 3rd IEEE International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging: From Nano to Macro - Arlington, VA, United States
Duration: 6 Apr 20069 Apr 2006

Publication series

Name2006 3rd IEEE International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging: From Nano to Macro - Proceedings
Volume2006

Conference

Conference2006 3rd IEEE International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging: From Nano to Macro
Country/TerritoryUnited States
CityArlington, VA
Period6/04/069/04/06

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