Twenty-one-gauge needles provide more cellular samples than twenty-five-gauge needles in fine-needle aspiration biopsy of the thyroid but may not provide increased diagnostic accuracy

V. Tangpricha, B. J. Chen, N. C. Swan, A. T. Sweeney, A. De las Morenas, J. D. Safer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

53 Scopus citations

Abstract

The technique of fine-needle aspiration (FNA) biopsy of the thyroid is important to evaluate malignancy in thyroid nodules. Eighty-five percent of thyroid FNA procedures lead to sufficient cellular material for diagnosis. With more cells aspirated, the chance of sufficiency for diagnosis increases. Large-bore needles lead to more cellular material being aspirated but bloodier specimens that may interfere with cytologic interpretation. Smallbore needles may result in too few cells for diagnosis. We conducted a randomized prospective study contrasting 21-gauge and 25-gauge needles in the evaluation of 50 consecutively enrolled nodules at our institution. In our investigation, 21-gauge needles more frequently provided superior biopsy specimens (50%) than did 25-gauge needles (18%). In the remaining specimens (32%), the 21-gauge and 25-gauge needles provided similar cellular material. The rate of sufficient samples was the same. We conclude that use of 21-gauge needles results in more cellular specimens but may not result in increased diagnostic accuracy.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)973-976
Number of pages4
JournalThyroid
Volume11
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - 2001
Externally publishedYes

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