Trial design: Rivaroxaban for the prevention of major cardiovascular events after transcatheter aortic valve replacement: Rationale and design of the GALILEO study

Stephan Windecker, Jan Tijssen, Gennaro Giustino, Ana H.C. Guimarães, Roxana Mehran, Marco Valgimigli, Pascal Vranckx, Robert C. Welsh, Usman Baber, Gerrit Anne van Es, Peter Wildgoose, Albert A. Volkl, Ana Zazula, Karen Thomitzek, Melanie Hemmrich, George D. Dangas

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

89 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background Optimal antithrombotic treatment after transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is unknown and determined empirically. The direct factor Xa inhibitor rivaroxaban may potentially reduce TAVR-related thrombotic complications and premature valve failure. Design GALILEO is an international, randomized, open-label, event-driven, phase III trial in more than 1,520 patients without an indication for oral anticoagulation who underwent a successful TAVR (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02556203). Patients are randomized (1:1 ratio), 1 to 7 days after a successful TAVR, to either a rivaroxaban-based strategy or an antiplatelet-based strategy. In the experimental arm, subjects receive rivaroxaban (10 mg once daily [OD]) plus acetylsalicylic acid (ASA, 75-100 mg OD) for 90 days followed by rivaroxaban alone. In the control arm, subjects receive clopidogrel (75 mg OD) plus ASA (as above) for 90 days followed by ASA alone. In case new-onset atrial fibrillation occurs after randomization, full oral anticoagulation will be implemented with maintenance of the original treatment assignment. The primary efficacy end point is the composite of all-cause death, stroke, myocardial infarction, symptomatic valve thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, deep venous thrombosis, and systemic embolism. The primary safety end point is the composite of life-threatening, disabling, and major bleeding, according to the Valve Academic Research Consortium definitions. Conclusions GALILEO will test the hypothesis that a rivaroxaban-based antithrombotic strategy reduces the risk of thromboembolic complications post-TAVR with an acceptable risk of bleeding compared with the currently recommended antiplatelet therapy–based strategy in subjects without need of chronic oral anticoagulation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)81-87
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican Heart Journal
Volume184
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Feb 2017

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