Treatment of diffuse basal cell carcinomas and basaloid follicular hamartomas in nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome by wide-area 5-aminolevulinic acid photodynamic therapy

Allan R. Oseroff, Sherry Shieh, Noreen P. Frawley, Richard Cheney, Leslie E. Blumenson, Eniko K. Pivnick, David A. Bellnier

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

87 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: To report the use of wide-area 5-aminolevulinic acid photodynamic therapy to treat numerous basal cell carcinomas (BCCs) and basaloid follicular hamartomas (BFHs). Design: Report of cases. Setting: Roswell Park Cancer Institute. Patients: Three children with BCCs and BFHs involving 12% to 25% of their body surface areas. Interventions: Twenty percent 5-aminolevulinic acid was applied to up to 22% of the body surface for 24 hours under occlusion. A dye laser and a lamp illuminated fields up to 7 cm and 16 cm in diameter, respectively; up to 36 fields were treated per session. Main Outcome Measures: Morbidity, patient response, and light dose-photodynamic therapy response relationship and durability. Results: Morbidity was minimal, with selective phototoxicity and rapid healing. After 4 to 7 sessions, with individual areas receiving 1 to 3 treatments, the patients had 85% to 98% overall clearance and excellent cosmetic outcomes without scarring. For laser treatments, a sigmoidal light dose-response relationship predicted more than 85% initial response rates for light doses 150 J/cm2 or more. Responses were durable up to 6 years. Conclusion: 5-Aminolevulinic acid photodynamic therapy is safe, well tolerated, and effective for extensive areas of diffuse BCCs and BFHs and appears to be the treatment of choice in children.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)60-67
Number of pages8
JournalArchives of Dermatology
Volume141
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2005
Externally publishedYes

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