Trauma patients meeting both Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's definitions for ventilator-associated pneumonia had worse outcomes than those meeting only one

Duraid Younan, Russell Griffin, Thomas Swain, Jean Francois Pittet, Bernard Camins

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Healthcare Safety Network (NHSN) replaced its old definition for ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) with the ventilator-associated events algorithm in 2013. We sought to compare the outcome of trauma patients meeting the definitions for VAP in the two modules. Methods Trauma patients with blunt or penetrating injuries and with at least 2 d of ventilator support were identified from the trauma registry from 2013 to 2014. VAP was determined using two methods: (1) VAP as defined by the “old,” clinically based NHSN definition and (2) possible VAP as defined by the updated “new” NHSN definition. Cohen's kappa statistic was determined to compare the two definitions for VAP. To compare demographic and clinical outcomes, the chi-square and Student's t-tests were used for categorical and continuous variables, respectively. Results From 2013 to 2014, there were 1165 trauma patients admitted who had at least 2 d of ventilator support. Seventy-eight patients (6.6%) met the “new” NHSN definition for possible VAP, 361 patients (30.9%) met the “old” definition of VAP, and 68 patients (5.8%) met both definitions. The kappa statistic between VAP as defined by the “new” and “old” definitions was 0.22 (95% confidence interval, 0.17-0.27). There were no differences in age, gender, race, or injury severity score when comparing patients who met the different definitions. Those satisfying both definitions had longer ventilator support days (P = 0.0009), intensive care unit length of stay (LOS; P = 0.0003), and hospital LOS (P = 0.0344) when compared with those meeting only one definition. There was no difference in mortality for those meeting both and those meeting the old definition for VAP; patients meeting both definitions had higher respiratory rate at arrival (P = 0.0178). Conclusions There was no difference in mortality between patients meeting the “old” and “new” NHSN definitions for VAP; those who met “both” definitions had longer ventilator support days, intensive care unit, and hospital LOS.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)123-128
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Surgical Research
Volume216
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2017
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Trauma
  • Ventilator-associated events
  • Ventilator-associated pneumonia

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