Transplant Infectious Diseases: A Review of the Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients Published Data

C. N. Kotton, S. Huprikar, D. Kumar

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

30 Scopus citations

Abstract

The Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients (SRTR) serves to collect data on organ transplants performed in the United States. Although the infectious diseases data are limited and include mostly pretransplant serologies and other nonspecific infection-related outcomes, this multicenter data collection allows for insightful national data and the ability to monitor trends over time. We reviewed the published concise reports for each organ type in SRTR reports containing data from 2005 to 2014, and summarized our findings with respect to cytomegalovirus (CMV), Epstein-Barr virus, posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD), hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV), HIV, general infection, and prophylaxis. Our review highlights a few developments. While rates of donor–recipient CMV serology combinations remain fairly constant over time, there are generally more seronegative donors and recipients among living donor transplants. There has been a reduction in PTLD for pediatric transplant recipients. There has also been a slight reduction in anti-HBV core antibody–positive donor organs and stable reporting of HCV-positive donor organs and HIV-positive recipients.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1439-1446
Number of pages8
JournalAmerican Journal of Transplantation
Volume17
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2017

Keywords

  • clinical research/practice
  • health services and outcomes research
  • infection and infectious agents
  • infection and infectious agents
  • infection and infectious agents
  • infection and infectious agents
  • infectious disease
  • posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD)
  • viral: Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)
  • viral: cytomegalovirus (CMV)
  • viral: hepatitis
  • viral: human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS)

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