Topical Autologous Blood Clot Therapy: Consensus Panel Recommendations to Guide Use in the Treatment of Complex Wound Types

Robert J. Snyder, Vickie Driver, Windy Cole, Warren S. Joseph, Alez Reyzelman, John C. Lantis, Jarrod Kaufman, Thomas Wild

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

The etiology of acute and chronic wounds goes beyond those often reported in the literature, including those with exposed structures, those in which the entire wound bed cannot be visualized, and patients who are not candidates for typical standard of care. Treatment options for these patients may be limited. TABCT is a viable option for these complex wound types and is not hindered by logistical, procedural, or patient factors. A consensus panel of providers with extensive experience in treatment of these wound types was convened to develop consensus recommendations on the use of TABCT in specific complex wound types. Four consensus statements were defined for TABCT use in patients who cannot undergo sharp or extensive debridement, as a protective barrier to prevent further bacterial ingress, in patients with wounds in which the entire wound bed cannot be safely visualized, and in wounds with exposed tendon and/or bone. Consensus panel recommendations show that TABCT application assists in maintenance of a moist wound healing environment, autolytic debridement, recruitment and delivery of factors essential for wound healing, prevention of pathogen entry, and ability to completely fill wound voids that cannot be fully visualized. Additional advantages of TABCT use are its cost-effectiveness, ease of access, minimal related complications, and proven clinical efficacy.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2-8
Number of pages7
JournalWounds
Volume35
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2023

Keywords

  • debridement
  • extracellular matrix
  • fistula
  • tunneling
  • undermining

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