Thyroid cancer necrosis not evident on imaging: A cautionary case series on poorly differentiated thyroid carcinoma diagnosed only on final pathology

John E. Beute, Alex M. Silberzweig, Brandon S. Gold, Ariana L. Shaari, Danielle A. Kapustin, Ammar Matloob, Eric M. Dowling, Michael T. Starc, Jun Fan, Azita S. Khorsandi, Margaret Brandwein-Weber, Mark L. Urken, Raymond L. Chai

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objective: Poorly-differentiated thyroid cancer (PDTC) is a highly aggressive malignancy which is recently defined and understudied in the radiologic literature. Necrosis is a key histopathologic criterion for the diagnosis of PDTC. We illustrate the current difficulty in accurate identification of histopathologic necrosis on preoperative imaging. Methods: A series of seven patients with the final diagnosis of PDTC from our institution were identified. Multimodality preoperative imaging was analyzed by two head and neck radiologists. Final pathology reports were queried confirming histopathologic evidence of necrosis. Results: Patients presented with a wide range of preoperative imaging features. A consistent imaging appearance confirming necrosis was not identified. All patients were subsequently upstaged to PDTC following final pathological analysis. Conclusion: A lack of definitive evidence of necrosis on preoperative imaging does not exclude the possibility of PDTC. We demonstrate the need for further research to establish a clear methodology for the preoperative diagnosis of PDTC.

Original languageEnglish
Article number104054
JournalAmerican Journal of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Medicine and Surgery
Volume45
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jan 2024

Keywords

  • Computed tomography
  • Imaging
  • Necrosis
  • Poorly differentiated thyroid carcinoma
  • Thyroid cancer
  • Ultrasound

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Thyroid cancer necrosis not evident on imaging: A cautionary case series on poorly differentiated thyroid carcinoma diagnosed only on final pathology'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this