The use of subjective cognitive complaints for detecting mild cognitive impairment in older adults across cultural and linguistic groups: A comparison of the Cognitive Function Instrument to the Montreal Cognitive Assessment

Clara Li, Yue Hong, Xiao Yang, Xiaoyi Zeng, Katja Ocepek-Welikson, Joseph P. Eimicke, Jian Kong, Mary Sano, Carolyn Zhu, Judith Neugroschl, Amy Aloysi, Dongming Cai, Jane Martin, Maria Loizos, Margaret Sewell, Jimmy Akrivos, Kirsten Evans, Faye Sheppard, Jonathan Greenberg, Allison ArdolinoJeanne A. Teresi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Introduction: This pilot study aims to explore the psychometric properties of the Cognitive Function Instrument (CFI) as a measure of subjective cognitive complaints (SCC) and its performance in distinguishing mild cognitive impairment (MCI) from normal control (NC) compared to an objective cognitive screen (Montreal Cognitive Assessment [MoCA]). Methods: One hundred ninety-four community-dwelling non-demented older adults with racial/ethnic diversity were included. Unidimensionality and internal consistency of the CFI were examined using factor analysis, Cronbach's alpha, and McDonald's omega. Logistic regression models and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis were used to examine the performance of CFI. Results: The CFI demonstrated adequate internal consistency; however, the fit for a unidimensional model was suboptimal. The CFI distinguished MCI from NC alone or in combination with MoCA. ROC analysis showed comparable performance of the CFI and the MoCA. Discussion: Our findings support the use of CFI as a brief and easy-to-use screen to detect MCI in culturally/linguistically diverse older adults. Highlight: What is the key scientific question or problem of central interest of the paper? Subjective cognitive complaints (SCCs) are considered the earliest sign of dementia in older adults. However, it is unclear if SCC are equivalent in different cultures. The Cognitive Function Instrument (CFI) is a 14-item measure of SCC. This study provides pilot data suggesting that CFI is sensitive for detecting mild cognitive impairment in a cohort of older adults with racial/ethnic diversity. Comparing performance, CFI demonstrates comparable sensitivity to the Montreal Cognitive Assessment, an objective cognitive screening test. Overall, SCC may provide a non-invasive, easy-to-use method to flag possible cognitive impairment in both research and clinical settings.

Original languageEnglish
JournalAlzheimer's and Dementia
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2022

Keywords

  • diverse culture
  • mild cognitive impairment
  • older adults
  • racial/ethnic minorities
  • subjective cognitive complaints

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