The use of a curved ophthalmic blade to facilitate incising mohs micrographic sections with the desired bevel despite anatomic obstructions

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Abstract

BACKGROUND. Mohs micrographic surgery involves incising the specimen with a bevel, which allows for inversion so that the entire surgical margin may rest in the same plane. Anatomic obstructions occasionally preclude this angle of incision. OBJECTIVE. The purpose of this study is to find a curved blade that can be used for harvesting Mohs specimens when the handle of the blade can not be passed tangentially around the tumor because of anatomic obstructions. METHODS. A Beaver Eye Blade and arthroscopic blade, both of which are curved and have two cutting edges, were used to incise Mohs specimens. RESULTS. The ophthalmic blade was easier to use and has a better angle than the arthroscopic blade. Where the straight blade would only allow for a perpendicular or obtuse angle of incision, the Eye Blade facilitated an acute or a 90-degree angle, respectively. CONCLUSIONS. The Beaver Eye Blade is a welcomed addition to the armamentarium of the Mohs surgeon for difficult-to-harvest sections, especially in the helix or internal nose.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)897-899
Number of pages3
JournalDermatologic Surgery
Volume24
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1998
Externally publishedYes

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