The role of preoperative intravenous pyelogram in operations performed for carcinoma of the colon and rectum

P. I. Tartter, B. M. Steinberg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

11 Scopus citations

Abstract

The relationship between preoperative intravenous pyelogram (IVP) and urologic complications after potentially curative operations for carcinoma of the colon and rectum was studied in 511 patients who underwent operation from 1976 to 1983. Forty per cent of the patients had preoperative IVP and these patients were significantly more likely to have undergone resection distal to the transverse colon than patients without preoperative IVP. Sex, age, urologic history, physical findings, abnormal urinalysis, elevated blood urea nitrogen (BUN) or serum creatinine levels and identity of the surgeon did not appear to influence whether or not an IVP was obtained before operation. Postoperative urologic complications were noted in 9.4 per cent of the patients; 87 per cent of the complications were retention or infection. Complications were significantly more common in male patients, particularly those with preoperative symptoms of retention, patients with elevated preoperative BUN or serum creatinine levels and patients who had resections distal to the transverse colon. Age, urologic history, physical findings, abnormal urinalysis results and the identity of the surgeon were not associated with postoperative urologic complications. The incidence of complications was the same in patients with normal and abnormal IVP results as well as for patients who did not undergo IVP. The findings of this study do not support the routine use of preoperative IVP for patients who undergo potentially curative resection for carcinoma of the colon and rectum.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)65-69
Number of pages5
JournalSurgery Gynecology and Obstetrics
Volume163
Issue number1
StatePublished - 1986

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