The prevalence of diagnosed tourette syndrome in Canada: A national population-based study

Jaeun Yang, Lauren Hirsch, Davide Martino, Nathalie Jette, Jodie Roberts, Tamara Pringsheim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

41 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: The objective of this study was to examine: (1) the prevalence of diagnosed Tourette syndrome in Canada by sex in youth (aged 12-17) and adults and (2) socioeconomic factors in this population. Background: The majority of epidemiological studies of tics have focused on children and youth, with few studies describing the prevalence of tics in adult populations. Methods: Canadian data on Tourette syndrome prevalence were derived from the Canadian Community Health Survey 2010 and 2011 cycles, a Statistics Canada population-based cross-sectional survey that collects information related to health status. We determined the prevalence of diagnosed Tourette syndrome and examined sociodemographic factors, including age, sex, education, income, employment, and birthplace. Results: Overall, 122,884 Canadians participated in the surveys, with 122 participants diagnosed with Tourette syndrome. The prevalence of Tourette syndrome was higher in males in youth: 6.03 per 1000 (95% confidence interval: 3.24-8.81) in males versus 0.48 per 1,000 (95% confidence interval: 0.05-0.91) in females, with a prevalence risk ratio of 5.31 (95% confidence interval: 2.38-11.81). In adults, the prevalence of Tourette syndrome was 0.89 per 1,000 (95% confidence interval: 0.48-1.29) in males versus 0.44 (95% confidence interval: 0.16.0-0.71) in females, with a prevalence risk ratio of 1.93 (95% confidence interval: 1.21-3.08). After adjusting for age and sex, adults with Tourette syndrome had lower odds of receiving postsecondary education or being employed and higher odds of having income lower than the median and receiving governmental support. Conclusion: Data on the prevalence of Tourette syndrome in adults are scarce because most studies focus on children. Our data demonstrate a decreasing prevalence risk ratio for sex in adults compared to children. A diagnosis of Tourette syndrome is associated with lower education, income, and employment in adulthood.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1658-1663
Number of pages6
JournalMovement Disorders
Volume31
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Nov 2016
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Tourette syndrome
  • epidemiology
  • prevalence
  • tics

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