Abstract

Background The relationship between margin distance and recurrence and survival for stage I non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) less than or equal to 2 cm is not clear. Methods Patient clinicopathologic data were reviewed from a pooled data set of stage I NSCLC lesions less than or equal to 2 cm resected by wedge resection at Brigham and Women's Hospital (BWH) between 2000 and 2005 and the International Early Lung and Cardiac Action Program (I-ELCAP) between 1999 and 2015. Multivariable models were constructed to evaluate the relationship between margin distance and recurrence and survival, adjusting for patient age, sex, tumor size, and histologic type. Optimal margin distance was determined for recurrence-free and overall survival using maximum χ2 values among survival distributions. Results Of 182 cases, 138 tumors had margin distance reported (113 BWH and 25 I-ELCAP). The average tumor size was 13.3 mm, and margin distance was 8.3 mm. During a mean follow-up of 49.6 months, there were 33 recurrences and 59 deaths. Increased margin distance was independently associated with lower risk of recurrence (odds ratio [OR], 0.90; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.83–0.98). Margin distance was also independently associated with longer survival (hazard ratio [HR], 0.94; 95% CI, 0.90–0.98). A margin distance greater than 9 mm was associated with longest recurrence-free survival and a margin distance greater than 11 mm was associated with longest overall survival. Conclusions Increased margin distance was independently associated with lower risk of recurrence and longer overall survival in patients undergoing wedge resection for NSCLC tumors less than or equal to 2 cm. These findings suggest that with a minimum appropriate margin distance, wedge resection may yield outcomes comparable to those of lobectomy.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1171-1178
Number of pages8
JournalAnnals of Thoracic Surgery
Volume104
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2017

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