The gene from the short arm of chromosome 3, at D3F15S2, frequently deleted in renal cell carcinoma, encodes acylpeptide hydrolase

Rikard Erlandsson, Ferenc Boldog, Bengt Persson, Eugene R. Zabarovsky, Rando L. Allikmets, Janos Sümegi, George Klein, Hans Jörnvall

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46 Scopus citations

Abstract

Loss or inactivation of a gene on the short arm of chromosome 3 may contribute to the genesis of renal cell carcinoma. A gene that corresponds to the most frequently lost RFLP site (D3F15S2) is expressed in a variety of human tissues, and at a particularly high level in the kidney. Its expression is markedly reduced in renal cell carcinoma. A database search showed that the gene product is closely related to or identical with acylpeptide hydrolase. The nucleotide identity between the rat acylpeptide hydrolase and the human gene at D3F15S2 is 88%, compatible with normal species differences. It is therefore likely that the human gene product is acylpeptide hydrolase. The renal cell carcinoma is then associated with a decrease of acylpeptide hydrolase activity. The gene may represent a tumor suppressor gene, whose loss contributes to the development of renal cell carcinoma. It might be speculated that it could act e.g. by affecting the activity of a small acetylated growth factor. Alternatively, its decreased expression may merely reflect the impairment of differentiation in RCC, compared to normal kidney. Loss of a linked but irrelevant gene by the 3p deletion is another possibility.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1293-1295
Number of pages3
JournalOncogene
Volume6
Issue number7
StatePublished - Jul 1991
Externally publishedYes

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