The effect of exoskeletal-assisted walking training on seated balance-A pilot study

Chung Ying Tsai, Pierre K. Asselin, Steven Knezevic, Noam Y. Harel, Stephen D. Kornfeld, Ann M. Spungen

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionpeer-review

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

Mastering exoskeletal-assisted walking (EAW) requires training of static and dynamic balance skills. These trunk control skills are important components of daily activities in the seated position for people with spinal cord injury (SCI). The purpose of the study is to determine if EAW training transfers to improved seated balance in people with SCI. Eight persons with paraplegia participated in EAW training. All of the participants had chronic complete motor SCI (duration of injury > 1.5 years). After finishing an average of 31 sessions of EAW training (in about 3 months), the participants demonstrated significant improvements in seated balance in most directions measured using computerized posturography compared to before training (P < 0.04). The initial findings suggest that EAW training resulted in proficiency of performing controlled seated balance in most directions. This gain in seated posture control may have important implications for improving activities of daily living in the seated position.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication2017 International Symposium on Wearable Robotics and Rehabilitation, WeRob 2017
PublisherInstitute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc.
Pages1-2
Number of pages2
ISBN (Electronic)9781538643778
DOIs
StatePublished - 12 Jun 2018
Event2017 International Symposium on Wearable Robotics and Rehabilitation, WeRob 2017 - Houston, United States
Duration: 5 Nov 20178 Nov 2017

Publication series

Name2017 International Symposium on Wearable Robotics and Rehabilitation, WeRob 2017

Conference

Conference2017 International Symposium on Wearable Robotics and Rehabilitation, WeRob 2017
Country/TerritoryUnited States
CityHouston
Period5/11/178/11/17

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