The cardiac response to exercise training: Echocardiographic analysis at rest and during exercise

Richard A. Stein, Donald Michielli, Jane Diamond, Brad Horwitz, Norman Krasnow

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

44 Scopus citations

Abstract

The effect of exercise training on left ventricular dimensions at rest and during steady state exercise was studied. Fourteen healthy sedentary students were studied with echocardiograms performed at rest and during the 3rd minute of supine bicycle exercise (300 kilopond-meters/min) before and after 14 weeks of vigorous interval bicycle training. Ventricular dimensions at end-systole and end-diastole were measured and stroke dimension and dimensional shortening (stroke dimension/end diastolic dimension) were calculated. Maximal rate, measured before training during maximal exercise testing, oxygen consumption increased 31 percent ± 6 (mean ± standard error of the mean); heart rate decreased 9 ± 3 percent at rest and 11 ± 3 percent during exercise (p < 0.05). Blood pressure was not significantly changed at rest or during exercise. Training was associated with an increase in end-diastolic dimension at rest (from 4.7 ± 0.11 to 5.0 ± 0.11 cm) (p < 0.05) with no change noted in end-systolic dimension. Stroke dimension at rest was increased (from 1.4 ± 0.05 to 1.7 ± 0.05 cm) (p < 0.05) as was dimensional shortening (0.32 + 0.01 to 0.35 ± 0.01) (p < 0.05). Exercise before and after training was associated with an increase in stroke dimension mediated by a decrease in end-systolic dimension. End-diastolic dimension remained constant and dimensional shortening increased 15 ± 6 percent. Exercise was associated with an increase in stroke volume mediated by an increase in contractility. The Frank-Starling effect was not demonstrable. Training resulted in increased stroke volume at rest mediated by enhanced preload (Frank-Starling effect) and increased dimensional shortening, unexplained by a decrease in blood pressure. Exercise after training was associated with an increase in stroke dimension and dimensional shortening from the higher value at rest. These changes are suggestive of an enhanced contractile state at rest and during exercise consequent to training.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)219-225
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican Journal of Cardiology
Volume46
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 1980
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'The cardiac response to exercise training: Echocardiographic analysis at rest and during exercise'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this