System sensitivity in preclinical small animal imaging

Arion F. Chatziioannou, Qinan Bao, N. Karakatsanis

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionpeer-review

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

Preclinical small animal imaging is an important tool at the disposition of biological researchers. While the range of studies performed by non-invasive preclinical imaging is greatly varied, high sensitivity is of key importance in any biological experiment with molecular imaging probes. The technologies that are used to achieve high system sensitivity mostly focus on the use of large solid angles and dense scintillator materials. In this work, we investigate and discuss different preclinical Positron Emission Tomography system designs and the effects of these designs on the overall sensitivity. We focus our investigations in hypothetical system geometries and scintillator materials and perform Monte Carlo simulations. The results indicate that preclinical PET systems based on detector materials that have minimal intrinsic background and higher effective atomic number, might offer performance advantages for situations where the weakest signal possible needs to be detected.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication2008 5th IEEE International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging
Subtitle of host publicationFrom Nano to Macro, Proceedings, ISBI
Pages1417-1420
Number of pages4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2008
Externally publishedYes
Event2008 5th IEEE International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging: From Nano to Macro, ISBI - Paris, France
Duration: 14 May 200817 May 2008

Publication series

Name2008 5th IEEE International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging: From Nano to Macro, Proceedings, ISBI

Conference

Conference2008 5th IEEE International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging: From Nano to Macro, ISBI
Country/TerritoryFrance
CityParis
Period14/05/0817/05/08

Keywords

  • Preclinical PET
  • Small animal imaging
  • System sensitivity

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'System sensitivity in preclinical small animal imaging'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this