Surveillance CT and the prompt use of CT-guided fine-needle aspiration in patients with head and neck cancer who have undergone surgery

Peter M. Som, Adam R. Silvers, Mark L. Urken

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

OBJECTIVE. The purpose of this study was to assess the usefulness of prompt CT-guided fine-needle aspiration in the evaluation of suspected tumor recurrence seen on surveillance images of patients who had undergone surgery for head and neck cancer. SUBJECTS AND METHODS. We reviewed 32 patients who had undergone CT-guided fine-needle aspiration after surgery for head and neck cancer. CT-guided fine-needle aspiration was performed with a 22-gauge spinal needle and a cytopathologist was present to assess the adequacy of the biopsy sample. As many as five needle passes were made. RESULTS. Of the 32 cases, pathologic findings revealed squamous cell carcinoma (n = 27), mucoepidermoid carcinoma (n = 2), neuroendocrine carcinoma (n = 1), papillary thyroid carcinoma (n = 1), and adenocarcinoma (n = 1). In 20 cases (62.5%) the results of CT-guided fine-needle aspiration were positive for tumor recurrence, whereas in 11 cases (34.4%) the results were negative. In one case (3.1%) the results were nondiagnostic. Of the 11 patients with negative findings on CT-guided fine-needle aspiration, two patients had a subsequent recurrence that was not at the biopsy site. There were no complications from the procedure. CONCLUSION. When a radiologist who is trained in head and neck imaging identifies with CT a possible early recurrence of tumor, the prompt use of CT-guided fine-needle aspiration is an effective way to diagnose these tumors so that appropriate treatment can be initiated.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1505-1508
Number of pages4
JournalAmerican Journal of Roentgenology
Volume173
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1999
Externally publishedYes

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