Subspecialty and Training Preferences for U.S. Neurosurgery Faculty with International Training

Adam Y. Li, Roshini Kalagara, Zerubabbel Asfaw, Alexander J. Schupper, Faizaan Siddiqui, Theodore C. Hannah, Addison Quinones, Lily McCarthy, Lisa Genadry, Isabelle M. Germano, Tanvir F. Choudhri

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Academic neurosurgeons with international medical training play a large role in the U.S. neurosurgical workforce. We aimed to compare U.S.-trained neurosurgeons with internationally trained neurosurgeons to reveal differences in subspecialty preferences and training opportunities abroad. Methods: We identified 1671 neurosurgeons from 115 Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME)–accredited neurosurgical residency programs. Data on demographics, institution characteristics, and chosen subspecialty were collected, and faculty were divided based on location of training. Univariate analysis and multivariable logistic regression compared faculty characteristics between training locations. Results: Compared with the U.S. medical school + U.S. residency group, the international medical graduate + U.S. residency group was more likely to subspecialize in oncology/skull base and vascular neurosurgery and complete a fellowship in the United States or internationally (P < 0.05). The international medical graduate + international residency group was more likely to subspecialize in oncology/skull base neurosurgery, more likely to complete an international fellowship, and less likely to practice general neurosurgery (P < 0.05). Neurosurgeons in pediatrics, radiosurgery, and vascular subspecialties were more likely to receive fellowship training in any location (P < 0.05). Additionally, functional neurosurgeons were more likely to complete fellowships internationally, spinal neurosurgeons were less likely to pursue international fellowships, and peripheral nerve neurosurgeons were more likely to have dual fellowship training in both the United States and abroad (P < 0.05). Conclusions: International medical training affected subspecialty choice and fellowship training. Internationally trained neurosurgeons more often specialized in oncology and vascular neurosurgery. Functional neurosurgeons were more likely to complete international fellowships, spine neurosurgeons were less likely to complete international fellowships, and peripheral nerve neurosurgeons more often had both U.S. and international fellowships.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)e326-e334
JournalWorld Neurosurgery
Volume164
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2022

Keywords

  • Academic neurosurgery
  • International fellowship
  • International medical school
  • International residency
  • Neurosurgery subspecialties

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