Stress Myocardial Perfusion Imaging in the Diagnosis and Prognosis of Women with Suspected Coronary Artery Disease

Jennifer H. Mieres, Leslee J. Shaw

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

Coronary artery disease is the single largest killer of women in the United States and claims the lives of more than 250,000 women each year. For several decades, there was the misperception that coronary artery disease was a "man's disease." The fact is that women are indeed vulnerable to coronary artery disease; however, they typically develop the disease 10 to 15 years later than men. Once coronary artery disease is evident, women have worse outcomes as compared with men. Therefore, early and accurate diagnosis of coronary artery disease is crucial for reducing heart disease mortality in women. Stress myocardial perfusion imaging using contemporary techniques has been shown to have significant value in the diagnosis and prognosis of coronary artery disease in women. Myocardial perfusion imaging with exercise or pharmacologic stress has been shown to add incremental value to the use of clinical variables or exercise electrocardiogram stress testing alone in the risk stratification of women with an intermediate clinical pretest likelihood of coronary artery disease. This review provides an overview of the role of stress myocardial perfusion imaging in the clinical evaluation of women with suspected coronary artery disease.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)330-336
Number of pages7
JournalCardiology in Review
Volume11
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2003
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Coronary artery disease
  • Myocardial perfusion imaging
  • Risk stratification
  • Women

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