Spatial sensitivity of human circadian response: Melatonin suppression from on-axis and off-axis light exposures: Spatial sensitivity of human circadian response

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Abstract

A better understanding of the spatial sensitivity of the human circadian system to photic stimulation can provide practical solutions for optimized circadian light exposures. Two psychophysical experiments, involving 25 adult participants in Experiment 1 (mean age = 34.0 years [SD 15.5]; 13 females) and 15 adult participants in Experiment 2 (mean age = 43.0 years [SD 12.6]; 12 females), were designed to investigate whether varying only the spatial distribution of luminous stimuli in the environment while maintaining a constant spectrally weighted irradiance at the eye could influence nocturnal melatonin suppression. Two spatial distributions were employed, one where the luminous stimulus was presented On-axis (along the line of sight) and one where two luminous stimuli were both presented Off-axis (laterally displaced at center by 14°). Two narrowband LED light sources, blue (λmax = 451 nm) for first experiment and green (λmax = 522 nm) for second experiment, were used in both the On-axis and the Off-axis spatial distributions. The blue luminous stimulus targeting the fovea and parafovea (On-axis) was about three times more effective for suppressing melatonin than the photometrically and spectrally matched stimulus targeting the more peripheral retina (Off-axis). The green luminous stimulus targeting the fovea and parafovea (On-axis) was about two times more effective for suppressing melatonin than the photometrically and spectrally matched stimulus targeting the more peripheral retina (Off-axis).

Original languageEnglish
Article number100071
JournalNeurobiology of Sleep and Circadian Rhythms
Volume11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2021

Keywords

  • Circadian phototransduction
  • Light-at-night
  • Lighting distribution
  • Melatonin suppression
  • Peripheral light

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