Sleep does not enhance the recovery of deprived eye responses in developing visual cortex

L. Dadvand, M. P. Stryker, M. G. Frank

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

20 Scopus citations

Abstract

Monocular deprivation (MD) during a critical period of visual development triggers a rapid remodeling of cortical responses in favor of the open eye. We have previously shown that this process is enhanced by sleep and is inhibited when the sleeping cortex is reversibly inactivated. A related but distinct form of cortical plasticity is evoked when the originally deprived eye (ODE) is reopened, and the non-deprived eye is closed during the critical period (reverse monocular deprivation (RMD)). Recent studies suggest that different mechanisms regulate the initial loss of deprived eye responses following MD and the recovery of deprived eye responses following RMD. In this study we investigated whether sleep also enhances RMD plasticity in critical period cats. Using polysomnography combined with microelectrode recordings and intrinsic signal optical imaging in visual cortex we show that sleep does not enhance the recovery of ODE responses following RMD. These findings add to the growing evidence that different forms of plasticity in vivo are regulated by distinct mechanisms and that sleep has divergent roles upon different types of experience-dependent cortical plasticity.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)815-826
Number of pages12
JournalNeuroscience
Volume143
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 13 Dec 2006
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • V1
  • critical period
  • development
  • ocular dominance
  • plasticity
  • sleep

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