Should I or Shouldn't I: Decision making, knowledge and behavioral effects of quadrivalent HPV vaccination in men who have sex with men

Emily A. Thomas, Stephen E. Goldstone

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

23 Scopus citations

Abstract

Prior to FDA licensure in men, a surgical practice (SG) offered the quadrivalent HPV vaccine (qHPV) off-label to men who have sex with men (MSM). We administered a written or telephone survey to MSM to elicit drivers and barriers to vaccination, sexual behavior changes post-vaccination, and knowledge. 191 subjects enrolled: 68 refused qHPV, 71 received qHPV <1 year ago, and 52 received qHPV >1 year ago. History of HPV infection (86%, n=164) and level of HPV and qHPV knowledge were high, with a mean of 10.8 of 13 knowledge questions correct. Ninety-seven percent of participants understood that qHPV does not cure present infection or disease. MSM refused qHPV for reasons including cost and not FDA approved; prevention of future HPV infection was the paramount driver for immunization. Vaccination did not affect sexual behavior.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)570-576
Number of pages7
JournalVaccine
Volume29
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 10 Jan 2011

Keywords

  • Human papillomavirus
  • Men who have sex with men
  • Viral vaccine

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