Short-term effects of atmospheric pressure, temperature, and rainfall on notification rate of community-acquired Legionnaires' disease in four European countries

J. Beauté, S. Sandin, S. A. Uldum, M. C. Rota, P. Brandsema, J. Giesecke, P. Sparén

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

25 Scopus citations

Abstract

Legionnaires' disease (LD) is caused by the inhalation of aerosols containing Legionella, a Gram-negative bacteria. Previous national- or regional-level studies have suggested an impact of climate on LD incidence. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of temperature, rainfall, and atmospheric pressure on short-term variations in LD notification rate. EU/EEA Member States report their LD surveillance data to the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control. Community-acquired LD cases reported by Denmark, Germany, Italy, and The Netherlands with onset date in 2007-2012 were aggregated by onset week and region of residence. Weather variables were extracted from the European Climate Assessment & Dataset project. We fitted Poisson regression models to estimate the association between meteorological variables and the weekly number of community-acquired LD cases. Temperature, rainfall and atmospheric pressure were all associated with LD risk with higher risk associated with simultaneous increase in temperature and rainfall. Temperatures >20 °C were not associated with a higher risk for LD. LD cases occurring during wintertime may be associated with sources less influenced by meteorological conditions.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)3483-3493
Number of pages11
JournalEpidemiology and Infection
Volume144
Issue number16
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Dec 2016
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Environment and public health
  • Europe
  • Legionnaires' disease
  • surveillance

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