Short-Term DAPT and DAPT De-Escalation Strategies for Patients with Acute Coronary Syndromes: A Systematic Review and Network Meta-Analysis

Toshiki Kuno, Atsuyuki Watanabe, Satoshi Shoji, Tomohiro Fujisaki, Hiroki Ueyama, Hisato Takagi, Pierre Deharo, Thomas Cuisset, Sripal Bangalore, Roxana Mehran, Gregg W. Stone, Shun Kohsaka, Deepak L. Bhatt

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Short-term (≤6 months) dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT) and DAPT de-escalation become attractive for patients with acute coronary syndrome. METHODS: A systemic search identified randomized controlled trials that included patients with acute coronary syndrome treated using (1) standard DAPT (12 months) with clopidogrel, prasugrel (standard/low dose), or ticagrelor; (2) extended DAPT (≥18 months); (3) short-term DAPT (≤6 months) followed by P2Y12inhibitor or aspirin; (4) 12-month DAPT with unguided de-escalation from potent P2Y12inhibitors to low-dose potent P2Y12inhibitor or clopidogrel at 1 month; and (5) guided selection DAPT with genotype or platelet function tests. The primary efficacy outcome (major adverse cardiovascular events) was a composite of cardiovascular death, myocardial infarction, or stroke. The primary safety outcome was major or minor bleeding. RESULTS: This meta-analysis included 32 randomized controlled trials with 103 497 patients. While there were no differences in efficacy between short, unguided de-escalation and guided selection strategies, unguided de-escalation was associated with reduced risk of major adverse cardiovascular events compared with standard DAPT with clopidogrel or ticagrelor (hazard ratio [95% CI], 0.67 [0.49-0.93] and 0.68 [0.50-0.93]). Both short DAPT followed by P2Y12inhibitor and unguided de-escalation were associated with reduced risks in safety compared with other strategies, including guided selection (hazard ratio [95% CI], 0.66 [0.47-0.93] and 0.48 [0.33-0.71]). Short DAPT followed by a P2Y12inhibitor was associated with reduced risk of major bleeding and all-cause death compared with standard, extended DAPT (eg, versus DAPT with clopidogrel; hazard ratio [95% CI], 0.64 [0.42-0.97] and 0.60 [0.44-0.82]). By rankogram, unguided de-escalation strategy was the safest and most effective strategy in reducing major adverse cardiovascular events and major or minor bleeding while short DAPT followed by P2Y12inhibitor was ranked the best for major bleeding and all-cause death. CONCLUSIONS: In patients with acute coronary syndrome, unguided de-escalation was associated with the lowest risk of major adverse cardiovascular events and major or minor bleeding outcomes, while short DAPT followed by P2Y12inhibitor was associated with the lowest risk of major bleeding and all-cause death.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)557-569
Number of pages13
JournalCirculation: Cardiovascular Interventions
Volume16
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Sep 2023

Keywords

  • acute coronary syndrome
  • aspirin
  • genotype
  • humans
  • percutaneous coronary intervention

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