Severe fat-soluble vitamin deficiency suspected secondary to intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy: A case report

Minhazur Sarker, Chloe Getrajdman, Leslie Warren, Lauren Ferrara

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Intrahepatic cholestasis is the most common hepatobiliary complication of pregnancy. Worsening cholestasis, measured by total bile acid levels, has been associated with an increased incidence of adverse fetal outcomes; however, maternal morbidity remains rare. This report highlights a case of severe fat-soluble vitamin deficiency suspected to be secondary to severe cholestasis. Active management with weekly vitamin supplementation and close outpatient follow-up resulted in the delivery of a 32-week healthy neonate. We propose consideration of screening for fat-soluble vitamin deficiency for patients whose pregnancy is complicated by severe cholestasis or early-onset cholestasis.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere00430
JournalCase Reports in Women's Health
Volume35
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2022

Keywords

  • Bile acids
  • Case report
  • Cholestasis
  • Fat-soluble vitamins
  • Vitamin K

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