Serum granulocyte colony-stimulating factor levels are not increased in patients with autoimmune neutropenia of infancy

Selim Corbacioglu, Jü;rgen U. Bux, Andrea König, Janice L. Gabrilove, Karl Welte, James B. Bussel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

13 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: To assess the role of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) in autoimmune neutropenia (AIN). Design: Serum G-CSF levels were measured in 57 children with AIN. Two different G-CSF-dependent assays were used: a solid-phase 'sandwich' enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and a proliferation assay. Sera from healthy persons and from patients with severe congenital neutropenia were used for negative and positive controls. Results: The median G-CSF level in healthy persons (n = 13) was low, 45.6 pg/mL (range <39 to 141 pg/mL). The median G-CSF level in patients with AIN (n = 57) was very similar, 45.5 pg/mL (range <39 to 2500 pg/mL). Forty-five (79%) of 57 patients with AIN had levels within the range of the control group. Seven (12%) had marginally increased G-CSF levels (141 to 400 pg/mL), and only 5 (9%) had levels higher than 400 pg/mL. The G-CSF levels measured by enzyme- linked immunosorbent assay correlated well with levels measured by the proliferation assay, thus demonstrating that antibodies present in patient sera did not affect the biologic activity of G-CSF Conclusion: G-CSF production in AIN is not increased despite the low neutrophil count, similar to thrombopoietin in immune thrombocytopenic purpura.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)96-99
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Pediatrics
Volume137
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2000
Externally publishedYes

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