Selective anticoagulation with active site-blocked factor IXa suggests separate roles for intrinsic and extrinsic coagulation pathways in cardiopulmonary bypass

T. B. Spanier, J. M. Chen, M. C. Oz, N. M. Edwards, W. Kisiel, D. M. Stern, E. A. Rose, A. M. Schmidt, E. A. Rose, J. G. Copeland, J. C. Chen, A. R. Khorasan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

42 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Multiple stimuli converge in cardiopulmonary bypass to create a tremendous prothrombotic stimulus. The ideal anticoagulant for cardiopulmonary bypass should selectively target only the intravascular stimuli, thereby eliminating pathologic clotting in the bypass circuit while preserving hemostasis in the thoracic cavity. We propose the inhibition of factor IX as such a targeted anticoagulant strategy. Methods: We prepared an inhibitor of activated factor IX and applied it to a primate model of cardiopulmonary bypass to confirm the anticoagulant efficacy of activated factor IX in this setting and to assess more subtle markers of thrombin generation, macrophage procoagulant activity, and cellular tissue factor expression. Seven baboons that received activated factor IX (460 μg/kg) and 7 that received heparin (300 IU/kg) and protamine underwent cardiopulmonary bypass for 90 minutes and were followed after the operation for 3 hours. Results: Analysis of plasma factor IX activity demonstrated adequate inhibition (<20%) of factor IX throughout cardiopulmonary bypass. Activated factor IX-treated baboons demonstrated similar circuit patency to heparin- treated baboons but had significantly diminished intraoperative blood loss. Preservation of extravascular hemostasis was further demonstrated in activated factor IX-treated animals by (1) significantly increased levels of thrombin-antithrombin III complex and prothrombin activation peptide (F(1+2)) without intravascular thrombosis, (2) significantly greater macrophage procoagulant activity in pericardial-derived monocytes, and (3) immunohistochemical evidence of tissue factor expression in pericardial mesothelial cells and macrophages. Conclusions: Anticoagulation with activated factor IX allows for intravascular anticoagulation with maintenance of extravascular hemostasis. These findings suggest activated factor IX as an agent that not only exemplifies a targeted approach to selective anticoagulation in cardiac surgery but also further characterizes the procoagulant milieu during cardiopulmonary bypass.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)860-869
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery
Volume116
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - 1998
Externally publishedYes

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