Screening for cognitive impairment in older general hospital patients: Comparison of the Six-Item Cognitive Impairment Test with the Mini-Mental State Examination

Jolien P. Tuijl, Evert M. Scholte, Anton J.M. De Craen, Roos C. Van Der Mast

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

73 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective To investigate the performance and usability of the Six-Item Cognitive Impairment Test (6CIT) as a screening instrument for cognitive impairment in older, general hospital inpatients/outpatients. Method In 253 general hospital patients aged ≥ 70 years, diagnostic accuracy of the 6CIT and time required to administer it were assessed using the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) as the criterion standard. Results The (negative) correlation between the 6CIT and the MMSE was very high (r = -0.82). Optimal comparability was found using a MMSE cutoff of ≤19 for lower and a;circ23 for higher educated patients, at a cutoff of ≥11 on the 6CIT that was not sensitive to educational level. The sensitivity of the 6CIT was 0.90 and the specificity was 0.96, whereas the positive predictive value was 0.83 and the negative predictive value was 0.98. The area under the curve was 0.95. The mean administration time was 5.8 min for the MMSE and 2.5 min for the 6CIT (p ≤0.01). Conclusions Diagnostic accuracy of the 6CIT was high. As the 6CIT is not sensitive to educational level, does not require advanced language skills, only takes a few minutes to administer and is very easy to use, it appears to be a suitable screening instrument for cognitive impairment in older patients in the general hospital.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)755-762
Number of pages8
JournalInternational Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry
Volume27
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2012
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • cognitive impairment
  • general hospital
  • older patients
  • risk factors

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Screening for cognitive impairment in older general hospital patients: Comparison of the Six-Item Cognitive Impairment Test with the Mini-Mental State Examination'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this