Schizotypal personality disorder in individuals with the Attenuated Psychosis Syndrome: Frequent co-occurrence without an increased risk for conversion to threshold psychosis

Anthony W. Zoghbi, Joel A. Bernanke, Julia Gleichman, Michael D. Masucci, Cheryl M. Corcoran, Allegra Califano, Justin Segovia, Tiziano Colibazzi, Michael B. First, Gary Brucato, Ragy R. Girgis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

The Attenuated Psychosis Syndrome (APS), proposed as a condition warranting further study in the fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5), is a controversial diagnostic construct originally developed to identify individuals at clinical high-risk for psychosis. The relationship of APS and Schizotypal Personality Disorder (SPD) remains unclear with respect to their potential co-occurrence and the effect of SPD on risk for conversion to threshold psychosis. We examined the prevalence and effect on conversion of SPD in a cohort of 218 individuals whose symptoms met APS criteria. Results indicated that SPD was highly prevalent (68%), and that SPD did not influence risk for conversion. Rather, total positive symptom burden measured by the Structured Interview for Psychosis-Risk Syndromes (SIPS; OR 1.12, p = 0.02) emerged as the strongest predictor of conversion. These data suggest that when encountering a patient whose presentation meets SPD criteria, the clinician should assess whether APS criteria are also met and, for 1–2 years, carefully monitor positive symptoms for possible conversion to threshold psychosis.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)88-92
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Psychiatric Research
Volume114
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2019

Keywords

  • Attenuated psychosis syndrome
  • Clinical high-risk for psychosis
  • Prodromal psychosis
  • Schizotypal personality disorder
  • Schizotypy

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