Role of vif in replication of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 in CD4+ T lymphocytes

D. H. Gabuzda, K. Lawrence, E. Langhoff, E. Terwilliger, T. Dorfman, W. A. Haseltine, J. Sodroski

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392 Scopus citations

Abstract

The viral infectivity factor gene vif of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 has been shown to affect the infectivity but not the production of virus particles. In this study, the effect of vif in the context of the HXB2 virus on virus replication in several CD4+ T-cell lines was investigated. vif was found to be required for replication in the CD4+ T-cell lines CEM and H9 as well as in peripheral blood T lymphocytes. vif was not required for replication in the SupT1, C8166, and Jurkat T-cell lines. The infectivity of vif-defective viruses depended on the cell type in which the virus was produced. In CEM cells, vif was required for production of virus capable of initiating infection in all cell lines studied. vif-defective virus produced by SupT1, C8166, and Jurkat cells and the monkey cell line COS-1 could initiate infection in multiple cell lines, including CEM and H9. These results suggest that vif can compensate for cellular factors required for production of infectious virus particles that are present in some cell lines such as SupT1, C8166, and Jurkat but are absent in others such as CEM and H9 as well as peripheral blood T lymphocytes. The effect of vif was not altered by deletion of the carboxyl terminus of gp41, a proposed target for vif (B. Guy, M. Geist, K. Dott, D. Spehner, M.-P. Kieny, and J.-P. Lecocq, J. Virol. 65:1325-1331, 1991). These studies demonstrate that vif enhances viral infectivity during virus production and also suggest that vif is likely to be important for natural infections.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)6489-6495
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Virology
Volume66
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - 1992
Externally publishedYes

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