Robotic mesh explantation (RoME): a novel approach for patients with chronic pain following hernia repair

Cosman Camilo Mandujano, Loic Tchokouani, Diego L. Lima, Flavio Malcher, Brian Jacob

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Post-herniorrhaphy pain is common with an estimated 8–10% incidence of mesh-related complications, requiring mesh explantation in up to 6% of cases, most commonly after inguinal hernia repairs. Reoperation for mesh explantation poses a surgical challenge due to adhesions, scarring and mesh incorporation to the surrounding tissues. Robotic technology provides a versatile platform for enhanced exposure to tackle these complex cases. We aim to share our experience with a novel robotic approach to address these complex cases. Methods: A descriptive, retrospective analysis of patients undergoing a robotic mesh explantation (RoME) for mesh-related chronic pain, or recurrent ventral hernia by two surgeons between the period of March 2016 and January of 2020. The patients were evaluated for resolution of mesh related abdominal pain as well as early post-operative complications. RoME was performed with concomitant hernia repair in cases of recurrences. Results: Twenty-nine patients underwent a robotic mesh explantation (RoME) for mesh-related chronic pain, or recurrent ventral hernia between March 2016 and January of 2020. Nineteen patients (65.5%) had a prior inguinal hernia repair and 10 patients (34.5%) had a prior ventral hernia repair. Indications for mesh removal included chronic pain with or without hernia recurrence. Seventeen patients (58.6%) reported improvement or resolution of pain postoperatively (63% with a prior inguinal hernia repair and 50% of patients with a prior ventral hernia repair). Five patients (17.2%) required mesh reinforcement after explantation. Nineteen patients (65.5%) underwent mesh explantation with primary fascial closure or no mesh reinforcement. The mean follow-up was 36.4 days. The most common postoperative complication was seroma formation (6.8%), with one reported recurrence (3.4%). Conclusion: Robotic mesh explantation in challenging cases due to the effect of chronic scarring, adhesions and mesh incorporation to the surrounding tissues is safe and provides an advantageous platform for concomitant hernia repair in these complex cases.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)4862-4868
Number of pages7
JournalSurgical Endoscopy and Other Interventional Techniques
Volume36
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2022
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Chronic pain
  • Mesh explantation
  • Minimally invasive surgery
  • Robotic surgery
  • Ventral hernia

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