Risk predictors of race disparity in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting: a propensity-matched analysis

Aleksander Dokollari, Serge Sicouri, Basel Ramlawi, Rakesh C. Arora, Daniel Lodge, Kelly M. Wanamaker, Leila Hosseinian, Ozgun Erten, Gianluca Torregrossa, Francis P. Sutter

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to compare long-term prognosis after isolated coronary artery bypass grafting between white and black patients and to investigate risk factors for poorer outcomes among the latest. METHODS: All consecutive 4766 black and white patients undergoing isolated coronary artery bypass grafting between May 2005 and June 2021 at our institution were included. Primary outcomes were long-term incidence of all-cause death and major adverse cardiovascular and cerebrovascular events in black versus white patients. A propensity-matched analysis was used 2 compare groups. RESULTS: After matching, 459 patients were included in each black and white groups while groups were correctly balanced. The mean age was 70.4 vs 70.6 years old (P ¼ 0.7) in black and white groups, respectively. Intraoperatively, mean operating room time and blood product transfusion, were higher in the black group while incidence of extubation in the operating room was higher in the white one. Postoperatively, hospital length of stay was higher in the black cohort. Thirty-day all-cause mortality was not different among groups. The median follow-up time was 4 years. Primary outcome of all-cause death was higher in the black versus the white, respectively. Major adverse cardiovascular and cerebrovascular events incidence was twice higher in the black compared to the white cohort (7.6% vs 3.7%, P ¼ 0.013). Risk predictors for all-cause death and major adverse cardiovascular and cerebrovascular events in blacks were creatinine level, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, ejection fraction <50% and preoperative atrial fibrillation. CONCLUSIONS: Racial disparities persist in a high-volume centre. Despite no preoperative difference, black minority has a higher incidence of major adverse cardiovascular and cerebrovascular events.

Original languageEnglish
Article numberivae002
JournalInterdisciplinary cardiovascular and thoracic surgery
Volume38
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jan 2024
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • CAD
  • Coronary artery bypass grafting
  • Long-term outcomes
  • Race
  • Risk factors

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