Risk for ischemic stroke and coronary heart disease associated with migraine and migraine medication among older adults

Emily C. McKinley, Christine L. Lay, Robert S. Rosenson, Ligong Chen, Victoria Chia, Lisandro D. Colantonio, Paul Muntner, Robert Urman, Michael E. Farkouh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

10 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Migraine has been associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD) events among middle-aged adults. The objective of this study was to determine the risk for ischemic stroke and coronary heart disease (CHD) events among older adults with versus without migraine. Methods: This retrospective cohort study was conducted using data from US adults ≥66 years of age with Medicare health insurance between 2008 and 2017. After stratification by history of CVD, patients with a history of migraine were matched 1:4 to those without a history of migraine, based on calendar year, age, and sex. Patients were followed through December 31, 2017 for ischemic stroke and CHD events including myocardial infarction or coronary revascularization. All analyses were done separately for patients with and without a history of CVD. Results: Among patients without a history of CVD (n = 109,950 including n = 21,990 with migraine and n = 87,960 without migraine), 1789 had an ischemic stroke and 3552 had a CHD event. The adjusted hazard ratio (HR) among patients with versus without migraine was 1.20 (95% confidence interval [95%CI], 1.07–1.35) for ischemic stroke and 1.02 (95%CI, 0.93–1.11) for CHD events. Compared to patients without migraine, those with migraine who were taking an opioid medication had a higher risk for ischemic stroke (adjusted HR 1.43 [95%CI, 1.20–1.69]), while those taking a triptan had a lower risk for CHD events (adjusted HR 0.79 [95%CI, 0.67–0.93]). Among patients with a history of CVD (n = 79,515 including n = 15,903 with migraine and n = 63,612 without migraine), 2960 had an ischemic stroke and 7981 had a CHD event. The adjusted HRs (95%CI) for ischemic stroke and CHD events associated with migraine were 1.27 (1.17–1.39) and 0.99 (0.93–1.05), respectively. Patients with migraine taking an opioid medication had a higher risk for ischemic stroke (adjusted HR 1.21 [95%CI, 1.07–1.36]), while those taking a triptan had a lower risk for CHD events (adjusted HR 0.83 [95%CI, 0.72–0.95]), each versus those without migraine. Conclusions: Older adults with migraine are at increased risk for ischemic stroke. The risk for ischemic stroke among older adults with migraine may differ by migraine medication classes.

Original languageEnglish
Article number124
JournalJournal of Headache and Pain
Volume22
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2021

Keywords

  • Coronary revascularization
  • Ischemic stroke
  • Migraine
  • Myocardial infarction

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