Retinoid modulation of insulin-like growth factor-binding proteins and inhibition of breast carcinoma proliferation

Joseph A. Fontana, Alicia Burrows-Mezu, David R. Clemmons, Derek Leroith

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102 Scopus citations

Abstract

Retinoids induce cellular differentiation and inhibit cellular proliferation. Proliferation of human breast carcinoma cells in vitro is markedly inhibited by these compounds. On the other hand, insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) and their receptors seem to be involved in the growth of certain breast carcinoma cells by autocrine or paracrine effects. Since the effects of both IGF-I and IGF-II may be modulated by specific binding proteins (IGF-BPs) we examined the possibility that one mechanism by which retinoic acid may inhibit cancer growth is by an alteration in these BPs, thereby blocking IGF’s growth effect.Retinoic acid (RA; 1 µm) completely blocked the effect of IGF-I (50 ng/ml) on enhancing proliferation of MCF-7 cells in culture. This effect of RA was not associated with any significant change in specific IGF-I-binding sites on these cells. RA induced a 3-fold increase in IGF-binding activity in conditioned medium, measured using a polyethylene glycol-immunoglobulin precipitation assay and a charcoal absorption assay. This increase was associated with the appearance of 42- and 46-kDa IGF-BPs on ligand blotting. The effect of RA on these IGF-BPs was time and concentration dependent. In contrast, during some experiments the 27- and 36-kDa BPs actually decreased.These findings support the hypothesis that RA may inhibit the growth of certain breast carcinoma cells by increasing the secretion of certain IGF-BPs, which could directly modulate the growth effect of IGFs.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1115-1122
Number of pages8
JournalEndocrinology
Volume128
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1991
Externally publishedYes

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