Retinal pigment epithelial dysfunction in patients with pigment dispersion syndrome: Implications for the theory of pathogenesis

Vivienne C. Greenstein, William Seiple, Jeffrey Liebmann, Robert Ritch

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

19 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: To test the hypothesis that the retinal pigment epithelial/photoreceptor complex is affected in patients with pigment dispersion syndrome and/or in patients with pigmentary glaucoma. Methods: Electro-oculograms were recorded from patients with pigment dispersion syndrome, pigmentary glaucoma, ocular hypertension, and primary open angle glaucoma and from control subjects. Electro-oculograms were recorded during 15 minutes of dark adaptation followed by 15 minutes of light adaptation. For each subject, dark-trough amplitudes, dark-trough latencies, light-peak amplitudes, light-peak latencies, and ratios of the light-peak amplitude to the dark-trough amplitude (Arden ratios) were calculated. Results: A 1-way analysis of variance of the Arden ratios indicated significant differences among the groups of subjects. Results of a post hoc Newman-Keuls test revealed that the mean Arden ratios of patients with pigment dispersion syndrome and patients with pigmentary glaucoma were significantly lower than the mean ratios of the controls, the patients with primary open-angle glaucoma, and those with ocular hypertension. Conclusions: The results provide support for the hypothesis that the integrity of the retinal pigment epithelial/photoreceptor complex is affected in patients with pigment dispersion syndrome and in those with pigmentary glaucoma. Congenital and/or structural abnormalities of the retinal pigment epithelial/photoreceptor complex should be considered when models of the etiology of pigment dispersion syndrome are proposed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1291-1295
Number of pages5
JournalArchives of Ophthalmology
Volume119
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - 2001
Externally publishedYes

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