Restricted feeding for 9 h in the active period partially abrogates the detrimental metabolic effects of a Western diet with liquid sugar consumption in mice

Lauren N. Woodie, Yuwen Luo, Michael J. Wayne, Emily C. Graff, Bulbul Ahmed, Ann Marie O'Neill, Michael W. Greene

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

60 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Obesity is a major public health concern that can result from diets high in fat and sugar, including sugar sweetened beverages. A proposed treatment for dietary-induced obesity is time-restricted feeding (TRF), which restricts consumption of food to specific times of the 24-hour cycle. Although TRF shows great promise to prevent obesity and the development of chronic disease, the effects of TRF to reverse metabolic changes and the development of NAFLD in animal models of a Western diet with sugary water consumption is not known. Objective: The objective of the current study was to evaluate the role of TRF in the treatment of obesity and NAFLD through examination of changes in metabolic and histopathologic parameters. Methods: To better understand the role of TRF in the treatment of obesity and NAFLD, we investigated the metabolic phenotype and NAFLD parameters in a mouse model of NAFLD in which obesity and liver steatosis are induced by a Western Diet (WD): a high-fat diet of lard, milkfat and Crisco with sugary drinking water. Mice were subjected to a short-term (4-weeks) and long-term (10-weeks) TRF in which food was restricted to 9 h at night. Results: Prior to TRF treatment, the WD mice had increased body mass, and exhibited less activity, and higher average daytime energy expenditure (EE) than chow fed mice. Approximately 4- and 10-weeks following TFR treatment, WD-TRF had moderate but not statistically significant weight loss compared to WD-ad libitum (WD-AL) mice. There was a modest but significant reduction in the inguinal adipose tissue weight in both WD-TRF groups compared to the WD-AL groups; however, there was no difference in epididymal and retroperitoneal adipose tissue mass or adipocyte size distribution. In contrast, the diet-induced increase in normalized liver tissue weight, hepatic triglyceride, and NAFLD score was partially abrogated in the 4-week WD-TRF mice, while systemic insulin resistance was partially abrogated and glucose intolerance was completely abrogated in the 10-week WD-TRF mice. Importantly, WD-induced metabolic dysfunction (substrate utilization, energy expenditure, and activity) was partially abrogated by 4- and 10-week TRF. Conclusions: Our results support the hypothesis that TRF aids in reducing the detrimental metabolic effects of consuming a WD with sugary drinking water but does not ameliorate obesity.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-13
Number of pages13
JournalMetabolism: Clinical and Experimental
Volume82
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2018
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Metabolism
  • Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease
  • Obesity
  • Time-restricted feeding
  • Western-diet

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