Responses to information about psychosocial consequences of genetic testing for breast cancer susceptibility: Influences of cancer worry and risk perceptions

Linda D. Cameron, Michael A. Diefenbach

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

70 Scopus citations

Abstract

We assessed the impact of information about psychosocial consequences of genetic testing for breast cancer susceptibility on interest in and beliefs about genetic testing, and whether these effects vary by levels of either cancer worry or perceived cancer risk. Women (N = 180) in an experimental study were randomly assigned to read one of four messages consisting of standard information along with information about either psychosocial advantages, potential disadvantages, both advantages and disadvantages, or no additional information. Women receiving only standard information reported higher interest in obtaining genetic testing than did women who received additional information about advantages, disadvantages, or both advantages and disadvantages. Cancer worry (but not perceived risk) predicted greater interest and more favorable beliefs about the benefits of testing. Beliefs that testing causes emotional distress were positively associated with worry and negatively associated with risk perceptions.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)47-59
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Health Psychology
Volume6
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2001
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Breast cancer
  • Genetic testing
  • Perceived risk
  • Worry

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Responses to information about psychosocial consequences of genetic testing for breast cancer susceptibility: Influences of cancer worry and risk perceptions'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this