Response to ‘hepatitis C cure improved patient-reported outcomes in patients with and without liver fibrosis in a prospective study at a large urban medical center’

Julie C. Sung, Brooke E. Wyatt, Ponni V. Perumalswami, Andrea D. Branch

Research output: Contribution to journalComment/debate

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Patient-reported outcomes (PROs) are important measures of quality of life. Direct-acting antiviral (DAA) drugs for hepatitis C virus (HCV) improved PROs in clinical trials. We prospectively evaluated the impact of DAA-based HCV cure on PROs and liver-related outcomes in real-world patients at a large urban medical centre. The Short Form (SF)-36 and three additional validated instruments were used. F3–4 fibrosis was defined as >9.6 kPa by transient elastography (TE); S2–3 steatosis was defined as >270 dB/m by TE-controlled attenuation parameter (CAP). Data were analysed by paired and unpaired t tests. Patients (n = 16) who did not achieve a sustained virologic response at 12 weeks (SVR12) were excluded. The study achieved its primary endpoint and showed a significant 30% improvement in the SF-36 vitality score, measured baseline to SVR12: 63 vs 82, P <.001 (n = 111). Scores in 24 of 25 PRO domains improved at SVR12 (P <.05). Nearly all gains exceeded 5%, indicating their clinical significance. Transaminase values and liver stiffness improved (decreased) significantly, baseline to SVR12 (p<0.005), but steatosis was unchanged (p=0.58). Patients with baseline F0–2 fibrosis and those with F3–F4 fibrosis both improved in 22 domains. Patients with baseline S0–S1 steatosis improved in more domains (23) than patients with S2–S3 steatosis (19). At baseline, patients with F3–F4 fibrosis and patients with S2–3 steatosis had worse scores in certain PRO domains than patients with F0–2 fibrosis or S0–S1 steatosis, but this difference resolved by SVR12. HCV cure led to meaningful gains in PROs, and these findings may encourage patients to seek treatment.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1502-1503
Number of pages2
JournalJournal of Viral Hepatitis
Volume27
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Dec 2020

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