Relationship Between Cognitive Impairment and Depression Among Middle Aged and Older Adults in Primary Care

Alex D. Federman, Jacqueline Becker, Fernando Carnavali, Monica Rivera Mindt, Dayeon Cho, Gaurav Pandey, Lili Chan, Laura Curtis, Michael S. Wolf, Juan P. Wisnivesky

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objectives: To determine rates of previously undetected cognitive impairment among patients with depression in primary care. Methods: Patients ages 55 and older with no documented history of dementia or mild cognitive impairment were recruited from primary care practices in New York City, NY and Chicago, IL (n = 855). Cognitive function was assessed with the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) and depression with the Patient Health Questionnaire-8. Results: The mean age was 66.8 (8.0) years, 45.3% were male, 32.7% Black, and 29.2% Latinx. Cognitive impairment increased with severity of depression: 22.9% in persons with mild depression, 27.4% in moderate depression and 41.8% in severe depression (p =.0002). Severe depression was significantly associated with cognitive impairment in multivariable analysis (standardized β = −.11, SE = 0.33, p <.0001). Discussion: Depression was strongly associated with previously undetected cognitive impairment. Primary care clinicians should consider screening, or expand their screening, for both conditions.

Original languageEnglish
JournalGerontology and Geriatric Medicine
Volume10
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jan 2024

Keywords

  • Montreal Cognitive Assessment
  • cognition
  • mental health

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