Relation Between Renal Function and Coronary Plaque Morphology (from the Assessment of Dual Antiplatelet Therapy With Drug-Eluting Stents Virtual Histology-Intravascular Ultrasound Substudy)

Chee Yang Chin, Gary S. Mintz, Shigeo Saito, Bernhard Witzenbichler, D. Christopher Metzger, Michael J. Rinaldi, Ernest L. Mazzaferri, Peter L. Duffy, Giora Weisz, Thomas D. Stuckey, Bruce R. Brodie, Claire Litherland, Ajay J. Kirtane, Gregg W. Stone, Akiko Maehara

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

We sought to examine the relation between various degrees of renal function and coronary plaque morphology by grayscale and virtual histology intravascular ultrasound (IVUS). ADAPT-DES was a prospective, multicenter registry of 8,582 consecutive patients treated using coronary drug-eluting stents with a prespecified grayscale and virtual histology-IVUS substudy. A lesion-level analysis of study participants was performed by comparing IVUS parameters of culprit and nonculprit lesions across tertiles of estimated creatinine clearance (CrCl). Preintervention IVUS imaging of 762 patients identified 898 culprit and 752 nonculprit native coronary artery lesions. Patients in the lowest CrCl tertile were older, more often women, and more often presented with stable angina. Compared with the middle and upper tertiles, the lowest tertile was significantly associated with culprit lesion smaller mean external elastic membrane cross-sectional area (12.9 vs 14.2 mm3/mm vs 14.9 mm3/mm, p <0.0001), smaller mean lumen cross-sectional area (5.5 mm3/mm vs 5.8 mm3/mm vs 6.1 mm3/mm, p = 0.002), and more dense calcium volume (11.5% vs 10.2% vs 9.7%, p = 0.02). Similar trends were found in the nonculprit lesions. Plaque rupture was least common in patients in the lowest tertile. On multivariable analysis, independent predictors of greater dense calcium volume were lower CrCl, hyperlipidemia, female gender, and presentation without ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction. In conclusion, in the present large-scale IVUS study diminishing renal function was associated with increased coronary calcification and decreased coronary vessel and lumen sizes, with a graded response according to the reduction in CrCl. In addition, these patients were more likely to present with stable angina versus patients with normal renal function who were more likely to present with an acute coronary syndrome.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)217-224
Number of pages8
JournalAmerican Journal of Cardiology
Volume119
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 15 Jan 2017
Externally publishedYes

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