Regional low-flow perfusion improves neurologic outcome compared with deep hypothermic circulatory arrest in neonatal piglets

Richard J. Myung, Matus Petko, Alexander R. Judkins, Gregory Schears, Richard F. Ittenbach, Robert J. Waibel, William M. DeCampli, Jason S. Sperling, W. Randolph Chitwood, Jakob Vinten-Johansen, Y. Joseph Woo, Gerald D. Buckberg, Jian Ye

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

52 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Regional low-flow perfusion is an alternative to deep hypothermic circulatory arrest, but whether regional low-flow perfusion improves neurologic outcome after deep hypothermic circulatory arrest in neonates remains unknown. We tested neurologic recovery after regional low-flow perfusion compared with deep hypothermic circulatory arrest in a neonatal piglet model. Methods: Sixteen neonatal piglets underwent cardiopulmonary bypass, were randomized to 90 minutes of deep hypothermic circulatory arrest or regional low-flow perfusion (10 mL · kg-1 · min -1) at 18°C, and survived for 1 week. Standardized neurobehavioral scores were obtained on postoperative days 1, 3, and 7 (0 = no deficit to 90 = brain death). Histopathologic scores were determined on the basis of the percentage of injured and apoptotic neurons in the neocortex and hippocampus by hematoxylin and eosin and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate-biotin nick-end labeling (0 = no injury to 4 = diffuse injury). Differences between groups were tested by using the Wilcoxon rank sum test, and results are listed as medians within a range. Results: There were no significant differences between groups during cardiopulmonary bypass. Postoperative neurobehavioral scores were abnormal in 25% (2/8) of the regional low-flow perfusion animals versus 88% (7/8) of controls. Regional low-flow perfusion animals had significantly less neurologic injury compared with controls on postoperative day 1 (0.00 [range, 0-5] vs 12.5 [range, 0-52]; P < .008). There was a trend for less severe injury in the regional low-flow perfusion group (2.0 [range, 1-4] vs 0.0 [range, 0-50]; P = .08) on hematoxylin and eosin. The degree of apoptosis was significantly less in the regional low-flow perfusion group (0.0 [range, 0-1] vs 2.5 [range, 0-4]; P = .03). Conclusions: Regional low-flow perfusion decreases neuronal injury and improves early postoperative neurologic function after deep hypothermic circulatory arrest in neonatal piglets.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1051-1057
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery
Volume127
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2004
Externally publishedYes

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