Reduction of left ventricular diastolic pressure as a key regulator of infarct coronary flow under mechanical left ventricular support

Tomoki Sakata, Spyros A. Mavropoulos, Renata Mazurek, Francisco J. Romeo, Anjali J. Ravichandran, Jonas M. Marx, Taro Kariya, Kiyotake Ishikawa

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Abstract: Restoring ischaemic myocardial tissue perfusion is crucial for minimizing infarct size. Acute mechanical left ventricular (LV) support has been suggested to improve infarct tissue perfusion. However, its regulatory mechanism remains unclear. We investigated the physiological mechanisms in six Yorkshire pigs, which were subjected to 90-min balloon occlusion of the left anterior descending artery. During the acute reperfusion phase, LV support using an Impella heart pump was initiated. LV pressure, coronary flow and pressure of the infarct artery were simultaneously recorded to evaluate the impact of LV support on coronary physiology. Coronary wave intensity was calculated to understand the forces regulating coronary flow. Significant increases in coronary flow velocity and its area under the curve were found after mechanical LV support. Among the coronary flow-regulating factors, coronary pressure was increased mainly during the late diastolic phase with less pulsatility. Meanwhile, LV pressure was reduced throughout diastole resulting in significant and consistent elevation of coronary driving pressure. Interestingly, the duration of diastole was prolonged with LV support. In the wave intensity analysis, the duration between backward suction and pushing waves was extended, indicating that earlier myocardial relaxation and delayed contraction contributed to the extension of diastole. In conclusion, mechanical LV support increases infarct coronary flow by extending diastole and augmenting coronary driving pressure. These changes were mainly driven by reduced LV diastolic pressure, indicating that the key regulator of coronary flow under mechanical LV support is downstream of the coronary artery, rather than upstream. Our study highlights the importance of LV diastolic pressure in infarct coronary flow regulation. (Figure presented.). Key points: Restoring ischaemic myocardial tissue perfusion is crucial for minimizing infarct size. Although mechanical left ventricular (LV) support has been suggested to improve infarct coronary flow, its specific mechanism remains to be clarified. LV support reduced LV pressure, and elevated coronary pressure during the late diastolic phase, resulting in high coronary driving pressure. This study demonstrated for the first time that mechanical LV support extends diastolic phase, leading to increased infarct coronary flow. Future studies should evaluate the correlation between improved infarct coronary flow and resulting infarct size.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1669-1680
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Physiology
Volume602
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - 15 Apr 2024

Keywords

  • cardiac physiology
  • coronary flow
  • left ventricular unloading
  • myocardial infarction
  • wave intensity analysis

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