Reducing duplicate genetic testing in inpatient and outpatient settings across a large safety-net system

Peter Alarcon Manchego, Mona Krouss, Daniel Alaiev, Joseph Talledo, Milana Zaurova, Komal Chandra, Surafel Tsega, Mariely Garcia, Kenra Ford, Stephen Apfelroth, Komal Bajaj, Dawi Shin, Hyung J. Cho

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objectives: To develop a system-wide electronic health record (EHR) intervention at a large safety-net hospital system to reduce wasteful duplicate genetic testing. Methods: This project was initiated at a large urban public health care system. An EHR alert was designed to be triggered when a clinician attempted to order any of 16 specified genetic tests for which a previous result existed within the EHR system. Measurements included the proportion of completed genetic tests that were duplicates and alerts per 1,000 tests. Data were stratified by clinician type, specialty, and inpatient vs ambulatory setting. Results: Across all settings, the rate of duplicate genetic testing decreased from 2.35% (1,050 of 44,592 tests) to 0.09% (21 of 22,323 tests) (96% relative reduction, P <. 001). The alert rate per 1,000 tests was 277 for inpatient orders and 64 for ambulatory orders. Among clinician types, residents had the highest alert rate per 1,000 tests at 166 and midwives the lowest at 51 (P <. 01). Among clinician specialties, internal medicine had the highest alert rate per 1,000 tests at 245 and obstetrics and gynecology the lowest at 56 (P <. 01). Conclusions: The EHR intervention successfully reduced duplicate genetic testing by 96% across a large safety-net setting.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)292-296
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Journal of Clinical Pathology
Volume160
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Sep 2023

Keywords

  • duplicate testing
  • genetic testing
  • high-value care
  • quality improvement
  • safety net

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