Reduced prefrontal hemodynamic response in pediatric autism spectrum disorder measured with near-infrared spectroscopy

Mitsuhiro Uratani, Toyosaku Ota, Junzo Iida, Kosuke Okazaki, Kazuhiko Yamamuro, Yoko Nakanishi, Naoko Kishimoto, Toshifumi Kishimoto

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Functional neuroimaging studies suggest that prefrontal cortex dysfunction is present in people with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Near-infrared spectroscopy is a noninvasive optical tool for examining oxygenation and hemodynamic changes in the cerebral cortex by measuring changes in oxygenated hemoglobin. Methods: Twelve drug-naïve male participants, aged 7-15 years and diagnosed with ASD according to DSM-5 criteria, and 12 age- and intelligence quotient (IQ)-matched healthy control males participated in the present study after giving informed consent. Relative concentrations of oxyhemoglobin were measured with frontal probes every 0.1 s during the Stroop color-word task, using 24-channel near-infrared spectroscopy. Results: Oxyhemoglobin changes during the Stroop color-word task in the ASD group were significantly smaller than those in the control group at channels 12 and 13, located over the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (FDR-corrected P: 0.0021-0.0063). Conclusion: The results suggest that male children with ASD have reduced prefrontal hemodynamic responses, measured with near-infrared spectroscopy.

Original languageEnglish
Article number29
JournalChild and Adolescent Psychiatry and Mental Health
Volume13
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 28 Jun 2019
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Attention
  • Executive function
  • Near-infrared spectroscopy
  • Pediatric autism spectrum disorder
  • Prefrontal hemodynamic response

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