Reduced anterior cingulate gyrus volume correlates with executive dysfunction in men with first-episode schizophrenia

Philip R. Szeszko, Robert M. Bilder, Todd Lencz, Manzar Ashtari, Robert S. Goldman, Gail Reiter, Houwei Wu, Jeffrey A. Lieberman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

88 Scopus citations

Abstract

Although frontal lobe structural and functional abnormalities have been identified in schizophrenia, their relationship remains elusive. Because the frontal lobes are both structurally and functionally heterogeneous, it is possible that some measures of frontal lobe structure may not have accurately identified relevant frontal lobe subregions. The authors hypothesized that the volumes of two dorsal, 'archicortical' subregions (i.e. superior frontal gyrus and anterior cingulate gyrus), but not a ventral, 'paleocortical' subregion (i.e. orbital frontal region) would be significantly and selectively correlated with executive and motor dysfunction in patients with schizophrenia as previously reported for the anterior hippocampal region. Volumes of these frontal lobe subregions were measured from magnetic resonance images based on sulcal anatomy in 20 men and 15 women with first-episode schizophrenia. All patients completed a comprehensive neuropsychological test battery while clinically stabilized that encompassed six domains of functioning: attention, executive, motor, visuospatial, memory and language. Findings indicated that reduced anterior cingulate gyrus volume was significantly correlated with worse executive functioning in men; among women, there were no significant correlations. Among men, anterior cingulate gyrus volume was significantly more strongly correlated with executive functioning than with attention, visuospatial, memory, language and general intellectual functioning. Neither executive nor motor functioning was significantly more strongly correlated with the dorsal 'archicortical' volumes than with orbital frontal volume. These findings suggest a link between executive deficits and dysfunction of the dorsal 'archicortical' system and implicate sex differences in their relationship in first-episode schizophrenia. (C) 2000 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)97-108
Number of pages12
JournalSchizophrenia Research
Volume43
Issue number2-3
DOIs
StatePublished - 16 Jun 2000
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Anterior cingulate gyrus volume
  • Executive dysfunction
  • First-episode schizophrenia

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